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Words You Mispronounce

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  • #16
    Originally posted by Gauleiter Bruce View Post
    It's Wed.Nesday.
    I "think it" like that so I spell it correctly, but virtually no English speaker includes the "d" in any form in their speech.

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    • #17
      I knew moot from moot court on The Paper Chase series.

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      • #18
        A guy I used to work with said anomalTy (added a T to anomaly).

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        • #19
          Originally posted by FSchmertz View Post

          I "think it" like that so I spell it correctly, but virtually no English speaker includes the "d" in any form in their speech.
          I do.

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          • #20
            Syncope
            Flaccid
            Anything with ae or aea together

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            • #21

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              • #22
                Clandestine.

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                • #23
                  fuch

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                  • #24
                    How should I know if I'm mispronouncing them?

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by antknot View Post
                      How should I know if I'm mispronouncing them?

                      You'll be American.

                      Americans have this inane ability to just phonetically pronounce words for ease, making them sound like simpletons.

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                      • #26
                        I mispronounced "hexadic" yesterday, it was so embarrassing.

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Gauleiter Bruce View Post
                          It's Wed.Nesday.
                          That's an artefact of Middle to Early Modern English phonetics. The "d" was once fully pronounced. But the tongue is in the same position for the "d" as it is for the "n", except that the tongue relaxes for the "n" after closing for the "d". So instead of closing completely for the "d", the tongue relaxes a bit, then a bit more for the "n". So in effect, we do kind of pronounce the "d" but in a rather loose (even sloppy) way for the following "n". The whole effect is further smeared by the "s", pronounced as "z", and even further for the following "d" in "day". Some people pronounce the "n" for almost a double sound as compensation. It's almost the same vocalic effect that makes a lot of people say "didn't" as "dinnt" or "dint", or "witness" as "widniss" or even "winness".

                          Try saying the consonant cluster "idnzd" clearly and feel the full effort in getting the first "d" cleanly pronounced. It's no wonder the "d" gets lost.

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by QillerDaemon View Post

                            That's an artefact of Middle to Early Modern English phonetics. The "d" was once fully pronounced. But the tongue is in the same position for the "d" as it is for the "n", except that the tongue relaxes for the "n" after closing for the "d". So instead of closing completely for the "d", the tongue relaxes a bit, then a bit more for the "n". So in effect, we do kind of pronounce the "d" but in a rather loose (even sloppy) way for the following "n". The whole effect is further smeared by the "s", pronounced as "z", and even further for the following "d" in "day". Some people pronounce the "n" for almost a double sound as compensation. It's almost the same vocalic effect that makes a lot of people say "didn't" as "dinnt" or "dint", or "witness" as "widniss" or even "winness".

                            Try saying the consonant cluster "idnzd" clearly and feel the full effort in getting the first "d" cleanly pronounced. It's no wonder the "d" gets lost.
                            Boringest-difficult course I ever took in college was a 400 level linguistics class. You'd have to be a real grind to get into language to that degree.

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                            • #29
                              Facetious. A word people use but never write.

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                              • #30
                                Quixotic.

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