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The Number of People on Food Stamps is Falling

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  • The Number of People on Food Stamps is Falling

    Gee, I wonder if Trump's crackdown on illegal immigration has anything to do with this?

    The number of Americans receiving benefits from the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), commonly referred to as food stamps, continues to drop, according to the latest numbers released by the United States Department of Agriculture, which oversees the program.

    As of July 7, 42.6 million Americans were receiving SNAP benefits during the current fiscal year, down from 44.2 million in 2016. The 2017 figure is the lowest since 2010, when 40.3 million people were on food stamps. The number peaked in 2013, at 47.6 million.

    An early version of SNAP began as legislation enacted in 1959. Two years later, President John F. Kennedy implemented a pilot version of the program. In 1964, new legislation made the program permanent. Under the program, working-age adults without children can receive benefits for three months in three years. After that time limit, they must work at least 80 hours per month or participate in an education or job training program for that same amount of time. States can temporarily waive the three-month time limit when unemployment rates rise, and many did so during the economic recession that started in the late 2000s.

    As the economy has improved, states have had to drop those waivers, especially since 2016. On April 1, 2016, after the first three-month period passed, an estimated 500,000 to 1 million people in 22 states lost their benefits... More
    BELOW: One of Lidl's first US grocery stores awaits customers on June 18, 2017 in Virginia Beach, Virginia. The German-based grocery chain is opening stores across the US, with its first locations opening on June 15.


  • #2
    It seems to say in the article you posted that the improving economy is the reason.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by cigarettesandtea View Post
      It seems to say in the article you posted that the improving economy is the reason.
      Yeahhhh, RIGHT... The Marxist media wouldn't admit illegal immigrants are at least 20% of the welfare roles if there was a gun to their head.

      Welfare Use by Immigrant Households with Children | Center for Immigration Studies ... A Look at Cash, Medicaid, Housing, and Food Programs (April 2011)

      Thirteen years after welfare reform, the share of immigrant-headed households (legal and illegal) with a child (under age 18) using at least one welfare program continues to be very high. This is partly due to the large share of immigrants with low levels of education and their resulting low incomes - not their legal status or an unwillingness to work. The major welfare programs examined in this report include cash assistance, food assistance, Medicaid, and public and subsidized housing.

      Among the findings:
      .
      * In 2009 (based on data collected in 2010), 57 percent of households headed by an immigrant (legal and illegal) with children (under 18) used at least one welfare program, compared to 39 percent for native households with children.

      * Immigrant households' use of welfare tends to be much higher than natives for food assistance programs and Medicaid. Their use of cash and housing programs tends to be similar to native households.

      * A large share of the welfare used by immigrant households with children is received on behalf of their U.S.-born children, who are American citizens. But even households with children comprised entirely of immigrants (no U.S.-born children) still had a welfare use rate of 56 percent in 2009.

      * Immigrant households with children used welfare programs at consistently higher rates than natives, even before the current recession. In 2001, 50 percent of all immigrant households with children used at least one welfare program, compared to 32 percent for natives.

      * Households with children with the highest welfare use rates are those headed by immigrants from the Dominican Republic (82 percent), Mexico and Guatemala (75 percent), and Ecuador (70 percent). Those with the lowest use rates are from the United Kingdom (7 percent), India (19 percent), Canada (23 percent), and Korea (25 percent).

      * The states where immigrant households with children have the highest welfare use rates are Arizona (62 percent); Texas, California, and New York (61 percent); Pennsylvania (59 percent); Minnesota and Oregon (56 percent); and Colorado (55 percent).

      * We estimate that 52 percent of households with children headed by legal immigrants used at least one welfare program in 2009, compared to 71 percent for illegal immigrant households with children. Illegal immigrants generally receive benefits on behalf of their U.S.-born children.

      * Illegal immigrant households with children primarily use food assistance and Medicaid, making almost no use of cash or housing assistance. In contrast, legal immigrant households tend to have relatively high use rates for every type of program.

      * High welfare use by immigrant-headed households with children is partly explained by the low education level of many immigrants. Of households headed by an immigrant who has not graduated high school, 80 percent access the welfare system, compared to 25 percent for those headed by an immigrant who has at least a bachelor's degree.

      * An unwillingness to work is not the reason immigrant welfare use is high. The vast majority (95 percent) of immigrant households with children had at least one worker in 2009. But their low education levels mean that more than half of these working immigrant households with children still accessed the welfare system during 2009.

      * If we exclude the primary refugee-sending countries, the share of immigrant households with children using at least one welfare program is still 57 percent.

      * Welfare use tends to be high for both new arrivals and established residents. In 2009, 60 percent of households with children headed by an immigrant who arrived in 2000 or later used at least one welfare program; for households headed by immigrants who arrived before 2000 it was 55 percent.

      * For all households (those with and without children), the use rates were 37 percent for households headed by immigrants and 22 percent for those headed by natives.

      * Although most new legal immigrants are barred from using some welfare for the first five years, this provision has only a modest impact on household use rates because most immigrants have been in the United States for longer than five years; the ban only applies to some programs; some states provide welfare to new immigrants with their own money; by becoming citizens immigrants become eligible for all welfare programs; and perhaps most importantly, the U.S.-born children of immigrants (including those born to illegal immigrants) are automatically awarded American citizenship and are therefore eligible for all welfare programs at birth.

      * The eight major welfare programs examined in this report are SSI (Supplemental Security Income for low income elderly and disabled), TANF (Temporary Assistance to Needy Families), WIC (Women, Infants, and Children food program), free/reduced school lunch, food stamps (Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program), Medicaid (health insurance for those with low incomes), public housing, and rent subsidies.

      More
      Overall Use Rates. Figure 1 shows the share of immigrant- and native-headed households with children (under age 18) using at least one major welfare program from 2002 to 2009. Overall, the figure shows that immigrant households with children have used welfare programs at consistently higher levels than natives for most of the last decade. In 2001, 50 percent of all immigrant households with children used at least one welfare program, compared to 32 percent for native households. By 2009, that had grown to 57 and 39 percent, respectively. Figure 1 also shows that the rate for Hispanic immigrant households with children is much higher than that for native households and immigrants generally.


      Figure 2 provides a detailed breakdown by type of welfare program. The figure shows that immigrant households with children use welfare at much higher rates than natives for food assistance programs and Medicaid. Use of cash and housing programs tends to be very similar to natives. Table 1 shows a detailed breakdown of the same information for all years, 2002 to 2009. The table shows that the pattern of higher immigrant use of food assistance and Medicaid has existed since 2002.
      .
      RELATED: Study: 70% of Texas' illegal immigrant families receive welfare (April 6, 2011)

      Thirteen years after Congress overhauled the American welfare system, 57 percent of immigrants with children, those in the country legally or not, use at least one government, welfare program according to a report released Tuesday by the Center for Immigration Studies...

      ...In Texas, 54 percent of legal immigrants and 70 percent of illegal immigrants receive welfare assistance, with illegal immigrants generally receiving benefits on behalf of their U.S.-born children, according to the study, written by a think tank that favors reducing immigration into the U.S.

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      • #4
        So you post an article then attack it's accuracy?

        Comment


        • #5
          Saw a report last night that said it was 14% before Obama came in and advertised that anyone can get an EBT card. Then it went to 47%. Now it's dropping again, thank goodness. When you have a government that doesn't embrace uselessness, people actually may feel a little useless. Maybe that's why our membership is dropping.

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          • #6
            That's not at all true, the numbers are way off.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by cigarettesandtea View Post
              That's not at all true, the numbers are way off.
              As usual, Smurph making up his own "facts". More than half of EBT card holder in Florida are older white people, and a undocumented worker cannot get an EBT card.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by QillerDaemon View Post
                a undocumented worker cannot get an EBT card.
                Inaccurate

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by biker View Post
                  Inaccurate
                  Not in Florida, they don't.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    SNAP is probably dropping because a) the economy has improved tremendously the last 8 years and b) in many states people can work and still get their Medicaid so less qualify for the food stamps.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by cigarettesandtea View Post
                      So you post an article then attack it's accuracy?
                      I say, the OP understates the impact of the crackdown on illegal immigration on the falling numbers of food stamp recipients by eluding to an "improvement of the economy" as the major contributing factor, and the second article I posted would seem to bear that out...

                      The Dept of Agriculture, the US Govt agency responsible for administering the SNAP program, doesn't even know the total number of illegal immigrants who are getting some form of nutrition assistance, and testified before a Congressional oversight committee to such, so it's fair to say, it's impossible for them to measure the decline in food stamp recipients attributed to those illegally participating in the program. But it's far to say any "improvement in the economy" is not the only contributing factor, and I say, it isn't even the most significant.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Heim View Post

                        I say the OP understates the impact of the crackdown on illegal immigration on the falling numbers of food stamp recipients by eluding to an "improvement of the economy" as the major contributing factor, and the second article I posted would seem to bear that out.
                        The second post is from 6 years ago, how does it bear out on what's happening today?

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                        • #13
                          Because scary brown people

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Praklatye View Post
                            The second post is from 6 years ago, how does it bear out on what's happening today?
                            Six years later, it's likely much worse.

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                            • #15
                              I doubt the government would have a report on the impact on SNAP from just the last 6 months as they usually release annual reports. And if you re-up for SNAP doesn't it take another several months before they even review your case?

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